Category: Research


Illinois News Bureau | Physical activity could combat fatigue, cognitive decline in cancer survivors

DE_EMA new study indicates that cancer patients and survivors have a ready weapon against fatigue and “chemo brain”: a brisk walk. Continue.

 

Chicago Tribune | Exercise linked to fewer memory problems in breast cancer survivors

Featuring EPL alumna, Siobhan Phillips!

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Breast cancer survivors who exercised more were less likely to report memory problems in a new study by researchers at Northwestern University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The study looked at moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, such as brisk walking, biking and jogging, and complaints of memory problems, which are common among breast cancer survivors. The authors found that physical activity was linked to lower levels of distress and fatigue, which in turn were associated with fewer reported memory problems. Continue.

Science Daily | Latin dancing may have health benefits for older adults

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A four-month dance program helped older Latino adults walk faster and improved their physical fitness, which may reduce their risk for heart disease, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific Sessions. Continue.

News Bureau Illinois | Study links physical activity to greater mental flexibility in older adults

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One day soon, doctors may be able to determine how physically active you are simply by imaging your brain. Studies have shown that physically fit people tend to have larger brain volumes and more intact white matter than their less-fit peers. Now a new study reveals that older adults who regularly engage in moderate to vigorous physical activity have more variable brain activity at rest than those who don’t. This variability is associated with better cognitive performance, the researchers say. Continue.

Well | Does exercise really make us smarter?

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Exercise seems to be good for the human brain, with many recent studies suggesting that regular exercise improves memory and thinking skills. But an interesting new study asks whether the apparent cognitive benefits from exercise are real or just a placebo effect — that is, if we think we will be “smarter” after exercise, do our brains respond accordingly? The answer has significant implications for any of us hoping to use exercise to keep our minds sharp throughout our lives. Continue.

News Bureau Illinois | Physically fit kids have beefier brain white matter than their less-fit peers

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A new study of 9- and 10-year-olds finds that those who are more aerobically fit have more fibrous and compact white-matter tracts in the brain than their peers who are less fit. “White matter” describes the bundles of axons that carry nerve signals from one brain region to another. More compact white matter is associated with faster and more efficient nerve activity. The team reports its findings in the open-access journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. Continue.

News Bureau Illinois | New evidence shows increase in obesity may be slowing, but not by much

Ruopeng An - professor of kinesiology and community health

In his 2014 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama referred to an August 2013 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study that showed a decline in the obesity rate among low-income preschool children, saying, “Michelle’s Let’s Move! partnership with schools, businesses and local leaders has helped bring down childhood obesity rates for the first time in 30 years, and that’s an achievement that will improve lives and reduce health care costs for decades to come.” While the CDC report’s data is encouraging, a new study published by University of Illinois kinesiology and community health professor Ruopeng An shows the notion that the American obesity epidemic has begun to reverse may be premature. Continue.

BBC News | ‘Late starters’ still have much to gain by exercising

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Taking up exercise in your 60s will still help stave off major ill health and dementia, research suggests. The study in the British Journal of Sports Medicine followed 3,500 healthy people at or around retirement age. Those who took up exercise were three times more likely to remain healthy over the next eight years than their sedentary peers. Exercise cut the risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease and depression. Continue.

 Science Daily | At 75, would Popeye still be able to take on Bluto?

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If Popeye were to age naturally like the rest of us, he would need more than just big muscles to stay independent during his senior years. When it comes to muscles and aging, the important thing is quality, not quantity, as shown by the findings of a study by Mylène Aubertin-Leheudre, PhD, a researcher at the Research Centre of the Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, affiliated with Université de Montréal. Continue.

Well | How exercise can help us learn

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Over the past decade, in study after study in animals and people, exercise has been shown to improve the ability to learn and remember. But the specifics of that process have remained hazy. Is it better to exercise before you learn something new? What about during? And should the exercise be vigorous or gentle? Two new studies helpfully tackle those questions, with each reaching the conclusion that the timing and intensity of even a single bout of exercise can definitely affect your ability to remember — though not always beneficially. Continue.